The Bug Genie team blog

What's cooking behind the scenes of The Bug Genie

So, what does it look like – Part 1?

with 4 comments

We’re closing in fast on the 3.2 release, and I guess many of you wonder what the changes are. While there have been numerous changes “under the hood”, the most noticeable changes will be the visual ones. And obviously, some parts of The Bug Genie have changed a lot more than others! To help guide you through some of the changes, we’ll have a few blog posts with some side-by-side comparisons with 3.1 vs 3.2, where we’ll describe the changes, and some of the reasoning behind it.

Let’s get started!

The new theme

The theme used in 3.0 and 3.1

The 3.2 frontpage, showcasing the new theme

As you’ll notice immediately after upgrading, 3.2 has had a major facelift. Our previous theme has done the job really well, and is attractive and good to look at on its own, but it was starting to look a bit “dated”. Also, elements have had a tendency to “blend” together, sometimes making it hard to recognize defined sections and other items.

The new theme has a unified look all across the system. We use more visible “framing” of certain elements, and buttons, links and icons are more prominent than before. The new look also has a bit more gradient to it, making it much less bland than before. More items also “react” to your interactions, such as pressed button and link states, better hover feedback, etc. The layout on the frontpage itself hasn’t changed though, so the frontpage is a good place to familiarize yourself with the new theme. As soon as your start navigating around, though, you’ll soon notice some changes!

 

“Your” pages

Dashboard

User dashboard in 3.1

The user dashboard in 3.1 is configurable, and consists of several dashboard views that can be added or removed so you get the information you want on your own dashboard. If you’ve used 3.1 you know what I’m talking about. So – what can we possibly have done for 3.2?

New dashboard look in 3.2

As you can see, the user dashboard has gotten much the same treatment as the frontpage. A simple visual refresh makes the sections much more defined (which is much more visible and useful in other views than the example ones), and all the different items on the dashboard have their own “space”. The “customize dashboard” icon has also been moved from next to the “Your projects” list, into the user menu in the top right corner. In 3.3 we hope to also implement draggable dashboard views (making dashboard configuration even easier), but until then you can play around with the dashboard editor just as in 3.1.

Account overview

The account overview is where you go to edit your settings and information. What does this look like in 3.1?

Account overview in 3.1

Fair enough. How did we change this in 3.2?

Account overview in 3.2

Never mind the import encoding error (this is a demo setup), as you can see, the account page is now much less “busy” and cluttered. The different sections have been better defined, and you can even see the new “OpenID” settings tab right there. In addition, we also have a button bar which shows quick links to your searches, an easy way to edit your password and gravatar, and a popup for your security key (used when using the cli interface). Changes are also instant whenever you do something or navigate around – no page reloads and no waiting.

 

That’s all for today. Tomorrow we’ll get to some of the more juicy stuff! See you around!

Written by Daniel André

March 15, 2012 at 13:25

Posted in Uncategorized

4 Responses

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  1. Wonderful job guys. Do you have any documentation for the 3.2 available yet?

    Ziegler

    March 15, 2012 at 15:15

  2. Hi Ziegle!
    (SCOPE) on The Bug Genie is driving crazy! How do I set up several (SCOPES)?
    Do you know any good links or docs, specs… etc.. that I may read?
    Please help.
    Thanks,
    Luis

    Luis

    March 29, 2012 at 16:07

  3. […] the first post, we looked out some of the first differences you’ll notice after upgrading to 3.2. This post […]

  4. […] the first and the second blog post in this series, we’ve taken a good look at the generic theme changes […]


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