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Archive for the ‘The Bug Genie 3.2’ Category

The Bug Genie 3.2.7 released

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Last week, we released version 3.2.7 (and 3.2.7.1 to hotfix an upgrade and installation issue). This release is a collection of all the development that has happened in the 3.2 version since last release which was almost a year ago.

There’s no need for releases to be this far apart, and we’ll try to not let it happen in the future. In the meantime, in this release you can enjoy:

  • Improved speed and stability
  • A whole slew of translation improvements
  • Support for PHP 5.5
  • Support for logging in via Mozilla Persona
  • General bugfixes

Until next time!

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Written by Daniel André

May 5, 2014 at 09:27

Posted in The Bug Genie 3.2

So, what does it look like – part 3

with 3 comments

In the first and the second blog post in this series, we’ve taken a good look at the generic theme changes and how we’ve worked to improve project management in 3.2. This post will highlight many of the changes we’ve made to the actual issue management. Let’s dive right in!

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Daniel André

April 4, 2012 at 08:10

Posted in The Bug Genie 3.2

Version 3.2 Release Candidate out!

with 7 comments

Finally! After quite the delay since the latest beta (beta 4), we’ve finally released the 3.2 release candidate. The 3.2 release is our best release ever, with so much new and good stuff it’s not even funny. If you haven’t already tried it out, you absolutely should!

Highlights, you say? Too much for a minor blog post, I say! One of the things you’ll notice immediately, though, is that we’ve given the entire application a much more modern and visually appealing look. The underlying database layer is significantly faster and more reliable, caching is enabled, and we’ve added features and fixed bugs in every part of The Bug Genie.

All we can say is – please, pretty please with sugar on top, go download the release candidate now, and help us make it the most stable release so far.

Written by Daniel André

March 9, 2012 at 19:59

Posted in The Bug Genie 3.2

Website refresh

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Hey all!

Before we could post the new beta version of our 3.2 release, there were several changes that needed to be made in the website infrastructure to prepare for some of the features we want to add while we polish the beta into a worthy RC. Today we launched the new and polished website, and we hope you find it just as easy to use as before. As you can see, we’ve tried to keep the same structure as before, but also wanted to add more content to several section, such as the new “help” and “community” sections.

Let us know if you find any bugs 🙂

Written by Daniel André

February 6, 2012 at 13:33

The Bug Genie 3.2 and UTF

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As discussed earlier on this blog, changes in The Bug Genie 3.2 to improve our support of Unicode may result in some data being mangled after upgrading to The Bug Genie 3.2 The technical reasons behind this have been explained before, this post is just to give a brief overview on what happens and how to fix it, for those of you upgrading from previous releases.

Do I need this?

If you use PostgreSQL, or are performing a fresh installation, this is not necessary. In addition, this may not be necessary when you upgrade from a prior release, especially if you do not use special characters.

The fix, if necessary, should be applied as soon as possible after upgrading, do not perform the fix before installing the 3.2 files. You may, if you wish, install the 3.2 files, run the upgrade script, and then explore your installation to see if the fix is necessary – if you see mangled characters in any text field then you will need to apply it. Do not adjust any field before applying the fix, as any new special characters will be destroyed.

If there are only a few to correct, you can always do this by hand, but the fixes below are more efficient if there are many issues.

The problem

We did not correctly handle the connection to the database in The Bug Genie 3.0 and 3.1. This meant there were occasional issues with special characters being mangled or lost in various places, such as fields in an issue. The connection opened to the server was not Unicode, and therefore the data was not stored in a Unicode fashion, leading to problems.

In The Bug Genie 3.2, we do create a proper Unicode connection, meaning the mangled data will now be shown as-is. While there were cases previously where the data was correctly shown, by ensuring the problem is resolved properly now, we avoid potential issues in the future.

The solution

There are two solutions available. If necessary, you should apply one before upgrading, but you can always check afterwards to see if a fix is necessary. You can apply the fix after upgrading as long as you do not add any Unicode characters to the database beforehand, as these will be destroyed by the fix.

If you have command line access to the server:

The following commands will resolve the issue. A database dump is made in the non-UTF format we used to use in The Bug Genie, this is then restored in the correct format. The database is recreated also, to ensure it is in UTF format, so please make sure you have the right permissions. We assume a database called thebuggenie, and a user called root. Change these if necessary.

mysqldump -h localhost --user=root -p --default-character-set=latin1 -c --insert-ignore --skip-set-charset -r dump.sql thebuggenie
mysql --user=root -p --execute="DROP DATABASE thebuggenie; CREATE DATABASE thebuggenie CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_general_ci;"
mysql --user=root --max_allowed_packet=16M -p --default-character-set=utf8 thebuggenie < dump.sql

If you don’t have command line access to server, but you do have phpMyAdmin:

You can also apply the fix using phpMyAdmin. The trick is to change the connection collation, which can be done via box on the front page

Collection Collation box on the phpMyAdmin front page

This should be set to latin1 when taking the database export (leave the file as UTF-8), then set back to utf8_general_ci when recreating the database and importing. The database collation should be set to utf8_general_ci, and this can be set via box to the right of the database name field:

Database creation field

Please remember to dump just the data of the database, and not the structure and data. This can be done by selecting a choice when exporting, you may have to choose an option ‘Custom – display all possible options’ first.

Written by lsproc

January 4, 2012 at 00:09

How The Bug Genie 3.2’s upgrader fixes your timestamps

with 2 comments

Note: The timezone fixer in the initial release of The Bug Genie 3.2 may not work if you have a huge number of issues and comments, as the process is very intensive. We will be performing further changes in the future, and a CLI task to perform this operation will be in a subsequent release of The Bug Genie 3.2. We therefore do not recommend using this tool if you have over 500 issues.

It’s a well known fact that The Bug Genie’s timezone support doesn’t work right in 3.0 and 3.1. One of the more serious bugs was with how timestamps were stored: they were stored in the timezone of the user who caused the action (i.e. opened the issue), and then adjusted to the timezone of the user viewing the thing which involved at time. Therefore, if you both created and viewed an issue which was opened at 03:00UTC, and your timezone is +3, it would be stored as 06:00, and you would see it opened as 09:00.

The cause of this is fixed in The Bug Genie 3.2, and new timestamps will be stored as UTC, so only your timezone offset is applied. This will fix your timezone problems for new issues, comments and so on, but not for previous ones. This is why the upgrade script gives you the option of fixing your timezones.

How does it work?

The script, if you ask it to, will go through every item in the database which involves a timestamp and will remove the offset coded into the database.

We look at the timezone of the user who caused the action (if he has one set, and it isn’t ‘sys’), and if one can’t be found we use the system timezone instead. Also note, if the guest user made a change, then the system timezone will also be used. If the outcome of this is UTC, then nothing needs to be done as there will be no error.

If, on the other hand, it is not UTC, then some work needs to be done. We can then perform the offset change on that timestamp, and this should in the majority of cases lead to the correct result. The advantage of this way is we catch cases where the user timezone is different to the system timezone.

There may still be some times which are incorrect, for example if either the user or system timezone had ever been something different prior to what it is during the upgrade, or if the user who caused the change cannot be identified (this is the case in the builds and milestones table). There is nothing that can be done in these cases to improve the accuracy, as we are suffering from either a lack of history of timestamp settings or users who performed actions, and so we give the option of disabling this conversion. You can also turn it off if you just want your timestamps left alone.

What will it convert?

Times will be corrected in the following tables:

  • articlehistory
  • articles
  • builds (will be corrected based on system timezone only)
  • comments
  • editions (will be corrected based on the system timezone only)
  • files
  • issues (posted, updated and being worked on since times)
  • log
  • milestones (will be corrected based on system timezone only)
  • projects (will be corrected based on the system timezone only)
  • vcsintegration

Written by lsproc

December 30, 2011 at 23:50

Workflow automation in VCS integration

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A much requested feature in VCS integration is the ability to close issues using the commit message. We have (finally) implemented this, but as usual, have decided to go a little bit further. In The Bug Genie 3.2, you will optionally be able to use your commit message to navigate through the issue’s workflow, using only basic syntax.

So how does this work?

You may have noticed that incoming emails allows you to navigate through the workflow. We work in a near identical fashion. The difference is how the message is structured.

In incoming emails, you use a syntax similar to this:

resolve issue
resolution=WONTFIX

This is my comment
---

The workflow steps and parameters are all on separate rows.

In VCS integration, we don’t have this luxury so we compact everything together:

Fixes issue 1 (resolve issue: resolution=WONTFIX)

Simply place the workflow step in brackets, and if there are parameters for the step, just place them after a ‘: ‘ delimiter. You can also have multiple parameters:

Fixes issue 1 (resolve issue: resolution=WONTFIX status=kittens)

You may also wish to perform multiple transitions at once, this can be done by using a ‘, ‘ delimiter after the parameters. You don’t have to supply parameters either:

Fixes issue 1 (confirm issue, resolve issue: resolution=WONTFIX, reopen issue)

If a workflow step fails, or if it doesn’t exist, you won’t be notified; so while there is no risk of a mistyped commit breaking the commit process, you may want to double check to see if your workflow step was applied.

Similarly to incoming emails, the workflow steps are just as they are in the toolbar when viewing an issue, so there is little to learn.

If you are eager to try this out, this feature will be appearing in our github repository later today. It will also be included in 3.2 beta 3, along with a working module (it has been broken as a result of the database changes).

Written by lsproc

December 21, 2011 at 22:10